Appomattox

Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 6:30pm
The American Civil War Museum - Appomattox

The Civil War placed new and unique strains on 19th-century Americans, and their nightly visions reflected those hardships. Dreams sometimes vividly brought to life the horrors of the conflict and at other times provided an escape from the hard realities of life and death during wartime. Using their own writings, tour the sleeping brains of Civil War-era Americans and uncover their deepest longings. With Jonathan White.

Thursday, November 9, 2017 - 6:30pm
The American Civil War Museum - Appomattox

What facts and perspectives do we need to consider in order to understand the Confederate statues on Richmond’s Monument Avenue? This program will attempt to make sense of the ongoing public discussions about contextualizing Confederate statues – in Richmond and beyond. With John Coski, ACWM.

Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 6:30pm
The American Civil War Museum - Appomattox

No Civil War guerrilla cut such a wide swath as Champ Ferguson. He claimed to have murdered 120 men by the War’s end, and soon after, was convicted and executed for killing 53 men. Discover how his story survived and found its way into our modern consciousness. With Brian McKnight, The University of Virginia’s College at Wise.

Tuesday, January 9, 2018 - 6:30pm
Off Site at Bull Daddy's, 7643 Richmond Hwy, Appomattox, VA 24522

Evolutions in firearm technology not only altered the course of the War, but also increased the brutality and suffering of those involved. Discover how manufacturing capacity, military tactics, and wound treatments compounded the impact of technological advancements, leading to the greatest loss of American life in U.S. military history. With Rod Stanley, American Civil War Museum. 

As space is limited, reservations are strongly encouraged and can be made by contacting Josie Butler at jbutler@acwm.org or 434-352-5791 ext. 203. Come early to grab a drink and a good seat.

Thursday, February 22, 2018 - 6:30pm
The American Civil War Museum - Appomattox

Born into slavery in Beaufort, South Carolina, Robert Smalls escaped bondage and became a Union military hero. Uncover how Smalls continued to promote African American rights with a soldier’s tenacity after the War, even in the face of rising racism in the late 1800s. With Bernard Powers, College of Charleston. 

Thursday, March 22, 2018 - 6:30pm
The American Civil War Museum - Appomattox

During the 1862 Shenandoah Valley and Peninsula campaigns, Union and Confederate soldiers faced harsh environmental conditions, which contributed to escalating disease and diminished morale. Discover how, in response to such conditions, the men forged informal networks of health care and adopted self-care habits, testing the boundaries of military discipline. With Kathryn S. Meier, Virginia Commonwealth University. 

Tuesday, April 10, 2018 - 6:30pm
Off Site at Bull Daddy's, 7643 Richmond Hwy, Appomattox, VA 24522

In Summer 1862, the Union economy nearly ground to a halt as pennies, nickels, and dimes mysteriously disappeared. Discover how northerners reacted, where the coins went, and what it tells us about the changing landscape of capitalism and government in the mid-1800s. With Michael Caires, University of Virginia. 

As space is limited, reservations are strongly encouraged and can be made by contacting Josie Butler at jbutler@acwm.org or 434-352-5791 ext. 203. Come early to grab a drink and a good seat.

Thursday, April 26, 2018 - 6:30pm
The American Civil War Museum - Appomattox

What made the Confederacy a nation? What made it so different from the United States as to warrant national independence? Throughout the Civil War, Confederates endeavored to define their nation using a potent combination of American history, southern racial ideals, and negative images of “The Yankee.” With Paul Quigley, Virginia Tech.
 

Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 6:30pm
The American Civil War Museum - Appomattox

The surrender of Confederate armies at Appomattox, Greensboro, and elsewhere during the spring of 1865 brought the Civil War’s formal hostilities to an end. But did those surrenders really end the Civil War? Explore the ways in which the nation was torn for years to come. With Edward L. Ayers, University of Richmond. 

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