Off Site

Saturday, September 21, 2019 - 9:00am
ACWM–White House of the Confederacy

Time Travelers, a biannual Richmond Region tradition, invites tourists and locals alike to discover the area’s treasures spanning 400 years of fascinating history! This includes historic homes and other one-of-a-kind attractions. Nineteen of the area’s historic sites will offer visitors a “Passport” to time-travel during a special admission-free weekend, September 21-22.
Click "Make a Reservation" below to download your passport!

Participating sites include:
Agecroft Hall & Garden
The American Civil War Museum’s White House of the Confederacy
The Branch Museum of Architecture and Design
The Chesterfield Museum and Historic Jail
Chimborazo Medical Museum (Richmond National Battlefield Park)
Clarke-Palmore House
Courtney Road Service Station
Dabbs House Museum
Deep Run Schoolhouse
Historic St. John's Church
The John Marshall House
Magnolia Grange
The Edgar Allan Poe Museum
Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site
Maymont
Meadow Farm Museum at Crump Park
Virginia Randolph Museum
The Valentine and Wickham House
The Valentine First Freedom Center

Sunday, September 22, 2019 - 9:00am
ACWM–White House of the Confederacy

Time Travelers, a biannual Richmond Region tradition, invites tourists and locals alike to discover the area’s treasures spanning 400 years of fascinating history! This includes historic homes and other one-of-a-kind attractions. Nineteen of the area’s historic sites will offer visitors a “Passport” to time-travel during a special admission-free weekend, September 21-22.
Click "Make a Reservation" below to download your passport!

Participating sites include:
Agecroft Hall & Garden
The American Civil War Museum’s White House of the Confederacy
The Branch Museum of Architecture and Design
The Chesterfield Museum and Historic Jail
Chimborazo Medical Museum (Richmond National Battlefield Park)
Clarke-Palmore House
Courtney Road Service Station
Dabbs House Museum
Deep Run Schoolhouse
Historic St. John's Church
The John Marshall House
Magnolia Grange
The Edgar Allan Poe Museum
Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site
Maymont
Meadow Farm Museum at Crump Park
Virginia Randolph Museum
The Valentine and Wickham House
The Valentine First Freedom Center

Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War's Most Persistent Myth
Tuesday, October 1, 2019 - 6:00pm
Virginia Museum of History and Culture | 428 N Arthur Ashe Boulevard Richmond, Virginia 23220

More than 150 years after the end of the Civil War, scores of websites, articles, and organizations repeat claims that anywhere between 500 and 100,000 free and enslaved African Americans fought willingly as soldiers in the Confederate army. But as Kevin M. Levin argues, such claims would have shocked anyone who served in the army during the war itself.

In this Banner Lecture, "Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth," Levin explains that imprecise contemporary accounts, poorly understood primary-source material, and other misrepresentations helped fuel the rise of the black Confederate myth. Moreover, Levin shows that belief in the existence of black Confederate soldiers largely originated in the 1970s, a period that witnessed both a significant shift in how Americans remembered the Civil War and a rising backlash against African Americans’ gains in civil rights and other realms.

Thursday, October 10, 2019 - 7:30pm
International Center Commons, University of Richmond | 28 Westhampton Way, Richmond, VA 23173

 

How does Douglass's 1869 "Composite Nation" speech, which argues that diversity and inclusion make a nation stronger, continue to resonate 150 years later? The 2019 Elizabeth Roller Bottimore will feature historian David Blight speaking about “Frederick Douglass's ‘Composite Nation’ 150 Years Later,” based on his book, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom, which received the 2019 Pulitzer Prize for biography. Dr. Blight is Sterling Professor of History and Director of the Gilder-Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University. His 2001 book, Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory (Harvard University Press, 2001), received eight book awards and launched an important sub-field in Civil War studies. It was the topic of his previous appearance as the Museum’s Bottimore lecturer in 1999.

David William Blight, newly named as the Sterling Professor of History, of African American Studies, and of American Studies, is a renowned historian who is considered one of the nation’s foremost authorities on the Civil War and its legacy.

Space is limited, registration is strongly encouraged.

Monday, October 14, 2019 - 6:30pm
Graduate Richmond | 301 West Franklin Street, Richmond, VA 23220

Discover how the photo of USCT Pvt. Hubbard Pryor became a national recruitment tool and then vanished from memory only to resurface as a depiction of Gabriel, the enslaved man who planned a large-scale rebellion in 1800. Speaker: Ana Edwards, ACWM

Special thanks to Graduate Richmond for hosting the event
Graduate Richmond

Tuesday, October 15, 2019 - 6:30pm
Charley's | 707 Graves Mill Road, Lynchburg, VA 24502

On April 16, 1866, a race riot erupted in Norfolk, Virginia. Discover the limits of the U.S. Army’s protection for African Americans and their civil rights when faced with ex-Confederates' paramilitary violence during the early years of Reconstruction. Speaker: Brianna Kirk, Ph.D. candidate, University of Virginia

Wednesday, October 16, 2019 - 5:00pm
Historic Tredegar

Join the American Civil War Museum at our brand new facility at Historic Tredegar for a relaxed educator-only open house. Enjoy wine, beer, and light refreshments while exploring ACWM's educator resources, from field trip programs to online lesson plans, and go on an after-hours guided tour of our new exhibit, A People's Contest. Admission is free, families are welcome to attend.

Friday, October 25, 2019 - 7:00pm
Virginia Museum of History and Culture | 428 N Arthur Ashe Boulevard Richmond, Virginia 23220

The Civil War resulted in the emancipation of 4 million enslaved African Americans. Explore how the choices and events in the transition from enslavement to freedom continue to shape the lives of Americans over 150 years later.

FEATURING:
Ta-Nehisi Coates, author
Manisha Sinha, University of Connecticut
Christy Coleman, American Civil War Museum CEO

The Virginia Museum of History and Culture's exhibit, Determined: The 400-Year Struggle for Black Equality will remain open for extended evening hours so that program attendees may visit.

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