Historic Tredegar

Hours
Open Daily – 9:00AM–5:00PM

Address
480 Tredegar St.
Richmond, VA 23219
(Get Directions)

Phone
804–649–1861 ext. 100

New signage is now in place on the new building at Historic Tredegar.

Located in downtown Richmond along the James River, the Historic Tredegar site is home to an award-winning 30,000 sq. ft. Museum surrounding the industrial ruins of Tredegar Ironworks. The building contains two galleries for exhibits (one permanent, one rotating) and has over 500 artifacts on display. 

Founded in 1837, Tredegar Ironworks was one of the country’s largest industrials sites before the Civil War and the largest in the Confederacy, supplying about half of the artillery for the Confederate Army.

Parking is available on site and is free with Museum admission. Please allow approximately two hours for your visit to Historic Tredegar.


Save 10% when you purchase your single site tickets online!

Adults$16
Seniors, Retired Military, Teachers, Students$14
Youth (6-17)$8
Active Duty Military$10
Members, Kids under 5Free

Current Exhibits

A People’s Contest
Struggles for a Nation and Freedom in Civil War America

Our new permanent, core exhibit, A People’s Contest: Struggles for Nation and Freedom in Civil War America, features hundreds of original artifacts, dynamic theater experiences and compelling imagery. Visitors will be able to explore, understand and feel the dramatic story of the American Civil War and its legacies.

Organized chronologically as well as by topic, each gallery within the exhibit explores an aspect of the War that occurred during the 1850’s and 1860’s. Political developments are interwoven with civilian experiences and military events, providing multiple perspectives in a multifaceted manner. Technology is used selectively to impact the visitors’ experience and encourage their engagement with artifacts and images.


Greenback America

This temporary exhibit tells the story of how the United States’ decision on how to pay off the Civil War transformed the relationship between government, the economy, banks, and citizens.

Using poems, songs, cartoons, newspaper clippings, and more, visitors will explore how Americans assigned cultural meaning to money and how doing so helped them interpret politics, patriotism, and race.